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 From:  redshift
8055.1 
Hello,
MoI looks great and I am exploring for the last couple of days so thought I would say Hi from sunny S of France - near Nice. I am getting an "atelier" kitted up for jewelry production with software, 3D printer and possibly casting machinery. I haven't committed to any particular hardware machines yet, still confused on the trade offs. For example the printers alone have massive price and build area differences. Looking to cast directly from a print ... burnout problems seem to abound, Top down printing looks good to me so I sent a friend to see the OctaveLight in China. EnvisionTEC are going that way too. Exciting times. The prices in EUR are approx landed prices in France with duty and sales tax (1/3 less in USA of course), except the EnvisionTEC which needs tax but maybe 8% (Swiss agent) added.

I was a jeweller a few decades ago in Hatton Garden (Bleeding Heart Yard, Greville St, Clerkenwell Rd. etc) but went off and did other things, software related. I did not buy Rhino; so MoI is completely new to me.
I want to make less of the geometric cookie cutter type of jewelry so a question if I may, would the attached models print or do they have something nasty like self intersections? If so, how to make a shape like these 2 on the right? The shape on the left the one (not fro MoI) is probably safer but relatively uninteresting. T Splines in Fusion look great ...

As an aside, my wireless 3DConnexion Spacemouse does not seem to work here, any tips please?

Thanks

Gary
France 06
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 From:  ed (EDDYF)
8055.2 
Hi Gary - Welcome to MoI.

I also use MoI in my jewelry business. Not for manufacturing, but for visualization:

https://www.keyshot.com/2011/cascadia-design-studio-custom-titanium-ring-design-with-moi-and-keyshot/

I assume you'll use STL file format for your 3D printing. There are programs available that test if your STL file is valid for printing. I've made some 3D prints from MoI (not jewelry) and they have always worked.

I see no reason your lofted rings would not work. As long as MoI shows the object is a solid, it should print fine.

Ed Ferguson
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 From:  Michael Gibson
8055.3 In reply to 8055.1 
Hi Gary, welcome to MoI and to the forum!

re:
> As an aside, my wireless 3DConnexion Spacemouse does not seem to
> work here, any tips please?

Are you on Mac? For some reason newer 3DConnexion drivers on the Mac stopped working with MoI, I don't know why and they have been unresponsive when asked about it. I should be able to investigate it for MoI v4 but for now if you install an older driver version it should work, see here for which version:
http://moi3d.com/forum/index.php?webtag=MOI&msg=7986.1


> would the attached models print or do they have something nasty like self intersections?

The small one in the attached 3DM file looks ready to print, but the larger one is not ready yet, it does have self intersections because it's actually 2 solids overlapping on top of each other. If you select one of them you'll see these kind of stippled patterns called "z fighting" where the 2 different objects are running right over top of the same surface area:


In order to print property the object should have one unified "skin" and not be made up of separate objects partially pushing through each other like that or overlapping over the same surface area.

Normally if you have 2 objects that cleanly push through each other you can combine them using Construct > Boolean > Union, which will intersect the 2 solids with each other and chop it up into different pieces and discard the pieces that are internal to both solids and glue together the remaining parts to form a new combined solid. This will probably not work in this kind of messy shared surface area case because the 2 surfaces there are not cleanly pushing through each other, the areas with shared surface area will have very shallow intersections which makes for rather complex wandering intersection results and makes it difficult to cleanly divide the objects at the intersections. Intersections need to form clean closed loops in order to divide things into different pieces. So this would probably need to be modeled a bit differently in order to work well, the second piece would need to have its own distinct shape in order to be merged with the other one rather than following along a similar surface area in several spots like it does now.

Hope that makes sense.


> If so, how to make a shape like these 2 on the right? The shape on the left the one (not fro MoI)
> is probably safer but relatively uninteresting.

Either of those should be possible in MoI, the basic technique would be to draw in several cross-section curves with the shape you want, arranged like this:



Then to construct the solid, select those curves and run the Construct > Loft command and set the "Closed" checkbox option that appears in the upper right command options area. That will build a result like this:



The "uninteresting" one could probably be formed by just one profile curve and using Construct > Revolve instead of Loft.

Hope this helps!

- Michael

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 From:  redshift
8055.4 In reply to 8055.3 
Hi Michael, Thank you. The small MoI one is a scaled down version of the large one, bracelet and ring sizes. As per your illustration - that's is how I lofted them in MoI but the curves were too dissimilar. Then I started again, used identical curves opposite each other, (2 pairs with the same number of points and ridges) but scaled 1 of the opposites. Hoping that stops the Z fighting.
I use a 64 bit laptop the SMouse works with other SW but it is not essential anyway. I just updated all drivers but it did not change the SM.

Hi Ed, You are right about the photography. Good work with Keyshot, anodising Titanium gets some great colours.

I worked in a studio and darkroom. Things have changed a lot but the basic rules probably still apply, maybe even in rendering.

You should not mix daylight, flash, tungsten or LED lighting, different colour temperatures.
Daylight from windows must be blacked out.
The difference between brightest and darkest areas must not be > 1.5 f stops.
A decent spot light meter is essential.
Shadows are reduced with tiny foil on card reflectors propped up with BluTac just out of shot
Glare is reduced by spraying the offending surfaces with diluted milk, polarising filters ...
Or multiple synced flashes bounced off umbrella reflectors ...
Better depth of field requires lots of light and a stopped down lens, f16 or 32.
Longer exposures with hi fstops achieve better colour.
... The new multi focal point cameras are amazing.


Cheers,

Gary
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