Project Curve Question

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 From:  chippwalters
7042.1 
Hi All,

Still learning and I have a question. I'm trying to *project* (1) rounded rectangle curve onto a solid object. It works but there are two questions I have.

1. How do I "stencil" it INTO the solid object? Right now it's just a curve floating in space?
2. How would I only "stencil" it onto the front and not the back (2)? OK, I can answer that one --> USE CLOSEST POINT.

OK. I think I figured it out. TRIM the object with the selected curve, then JOIN. Is this the standard way to do this? TIA.

EDITED: 18 Nov 2014 by CHIPPWALTERS

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 From:  DannyT (DANTAS)
7042.2 In reply to 7042.1 
Hi Chipp,

> Is this the standard way to do this?

You've got it in one :)

-
~Danny~
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 From:  Michael Gibson
7042.3 In reply to 7042.1 
Hi Chipp, yes like Danny writes above using Trim is the regular way to embed a curve onto a surface such that it divides the surface into multiple separate pieces.

Trim does have planar curve projection built into it as well, so for many cases you can just trim directly to the 2D curve rather than doing the projection as a separate intermediate step. But if you want to only cut one side of a closed surface like that, you would either do the projection separately and then trim only with one of the results, or you could also extrude the cutting curve into a solid that only went through one side of the target object and then use the extruded piece as the cutting object in Trim.


> 2. How would I only "stencil" it onto the front and not the back (2)? OK, I can
> answer that one --> USE CLOSEST POINT.

The main way for projection is to just delete the back side one that you don't want. The "closest point" method of project will do a different type of projection where it sort of sucks down the curve by dropping it to the closest point it can find on the surface rather than projecting it along a specific single direction. This results in a different kind of shape of the projection and also it tends to be rather finicky if the curve is not pretty close to the surface and can tend to make a poor quality result, the mechanism that does it still needs to be reworked somewhat.

- Michael
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