more rapid prototype parts

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 From:  twofoot
4048.1 
Hi all. These are "fit and function" test pieces at 1/4 full size. Of course, I used Moi to create the solid models.

See more photos from the restoration here:
http://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=87751&id=1028872987&l=a78094d801

Cheers,

Chris








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 From:  Michael Gibson
4048.2 In reply to 4048.1 
These are looking great Chris, thanks for posting the pics!

What are the next steps for these? Will you do a 3D print at full size in some kind of material and use it directly, or will you be making a mold or something for metal parts?

- Michael
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 From:  twofoot
4048.3 In reply to 4048.2 
Hi Michael. Once the final drawings are all tweaked and approved, I will have them CNC cut in Ren-Shape. This is an industrial prototype material that is dimensionally stable, holds detail, and machines easily. The cut pieces will then be used as foundry patterns for sand casting in ductile iron.

I had originally thought to have them 3D printed, but the parts would not be durable enough to hold up as foundry patterns. They would also be *obscenely expensive* to print! LOL

I cannot wait to see what Moi version 3.0 brings us!

Cheers,

Chris
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 From:  Bob (PHOTON713)
4048.4 In reply to 4048.3 
Good Morning, twofoot...

I too, am using 3D printed output from MOI for foundry casting in ductile iron. Can you tell me what material you are finding coming from your 3D printer is working best for foundry casting? I am presently using a SLA printer at a local engineering firm. I have found that if the foundry uses the air-set method of green sand casting, the output is excellent, but, the SLA material is fragile, and easily broken if not handled properly. The foundry is now requesting a split pattern for patternmaking and I'm a bit concerned about handling the 3d printed material if I continue to use the SLA printer. The printing company is hardening the output with epoxy to toughen it up. I had previously gotten a quote from one of the online service bureaus, printing in plastic, that was too expensive. Your samples look a bit smoother than SLA output.

Regards...Bob
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 From:  twofoot
4048.5 In reply to 4048.4 
Hi Bob. I've sent you an email.

Chris
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