Nice bevel or radius on surface of Chinese characters  1-20  21-40  41-55

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 From:  Joe (JPITZ31)
2799.21 In reply to 2799.20 
Pilou,

What would be the advantages of using inkscape? Can inkscape perform height maps?

Thanks

Joe
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 From:  Frenchy Pilou (PILOU)
2799.22 In reply to 2799.21 
No limite of size ;)
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Pilou
Is beautiful that please without concept!
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 From:  Joe (JPITZ31)
2799.23 In reply to 2799.22 
Thanks Pilou

Joe
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 From:  ed (EDDYF)
2799.24 
Looks like Zsurf is a nice companion to MoI when certain organic shapes are needed.

As a jeweler, I'd love to be able to create a 3D design in Zsurf on a rectangle, then be able to wrap it around a cylinder (ring) in MoI.

For example, I want to create a render of a ring with a hammered finish, without using a bump map. For close up renders, you can't beat having the actual geometry.

Ed
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 From:  BurrMan
2799.25 In reply to 2799.20 
Hi Joe,
THe 2d operations comment in it's simplist form would be to take just the curve you extrudued and run a profile operation with a corner radius tool on the upper edge of the geometry to create the edge surface. So one profile cut to extract the shape out of a block then the second to get the fillet.

I'll post some more details about the other stuff in just a bit.
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 From:  Michael Gibson
2799.26 In reply to 2799.24 
Hi Ed,

> As a jeweler, I'd love to be able to create a 3D design in Zsurf on a
> rectangle, then be able to wrap it around a cylinder (ring) in MoI.

Actually ZSurf has some options such as using a cylinder for the base surface instead of only a flat plane, which sounds like it would do what you want here.

Check out this previous thread for an example:
http://moi3d.com/forum/index.php?webtag=MOI&msg=636.7

- Michael
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 From:  BurrMan
2799.27 In reply to 2799.20 
Hi Joe,
The trimming I was refering to is, if you do a curve array, in the tight corners you'll end up with what looks like this:



If you select these:



Then run the "Trim" command from the edit menu, it will look like this:



You can hit done or right click to accept and leave all the pieces there, then go in and delete what would be overlapping pieces:



Then you end up with more manageble/workable curves:



With these curves you can do some extra work to get your surface through those tight areas.





THe other thing I mentioned was about trying to do it with 2d operations. If you did the stepover math and knew how many levels you would need to get a clean surface cut by doing level profile cuts with a ball mill or something, you could go to a front view and array a bunch of "levels" up in the Z direction.



THen you could trim those curves with these level lines and get a result like this:



This would give you segments at various points on those curves that would have "end snap points" on them:



I could then use the curve through points command to draw curves by snapping to the endpoints of each individual section:



BTW: I used the new MoI scene browser to assign a style to each level. THen I could hide all others and work with one level at a time.


Or I could pick each level seperatly and loft just those little short pieces (It works better than trying to do the entire large curves that bunch up more) to create a surface, then join them all together for the larger surface that I can do a 3d toolpath on:



Just a note: the last lofted surface picture is deceiving in that it wouldnt be just a straight forward loft. I would have to fix a few areas where the gaps were not well defined to keep the loft going in the right direction.

Still with a bit of practice, MoI will do anything you want it to do!

Hope that helps a bit and didnt just make it more confusing.

Burr

EDITED: 19 Jun 2012 by BURRMAN

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 From:  BurrMan
2799.28 In reply to 2799.27 
And of course, just using your tooling to cut the profile alone produces a nice charater shape!




EDITED: 19 Jun 2012 by BURRMAN

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 From:  ed (EDDYF)
2799.29 In reply to 2799.26 
Thanks Michael - I'm going to try making a relief pattern in Zsurf on a cylinder, then boolean it with a same-size ring in MoI.

That posting you referenced is two years old. Two years ago I didn't even know how to spell MoI :)

There's some good information in those older posts. I'll need to find time to read back through the forum.

Ed
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 From:  Joe (JPITZ31)
2799.30 In reply to 2799.28 
Thanks Burr,

Way cool. I really appreciate you taking the time to explain all of this. Would you connect the points on the flat surface or would you use a command like Network or Blend to fill in the center of the character?

Thanks

Joe
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 From:  Michael Gibson
2799.31 In reply to 2799.29 
Hi Ed,

> Thanks Michael - I'm going to try making a relief pattern in
> Zsurf on a cylinder, then boolean it with a same-size ring in MoI.

One note on this - since you will be dealing with an open surface with the ZSurf generated bit, you may need to use the Trim command to cut the cylinder and leave a hole, then use Join to glue the pieces together, rather than using booleans.

Booleans are more oriented towards working on volumes, so they may not understand which pieces to keep and remove automatically if you are working on open surfaces.

But Trim works on the surface skin of objects only so it's more what you use (along with Join at the end) when you're working on surfaces instead of volumes.

- Michael
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 From:  BurrMan
2799.32 In reply to 2799.30 
Hi Joe,
The idea for creating the Z level curves would be to use them in your cam package as profile operations. No surfacing.

But with the smaller increments, things like lofting between those curves may work much better. (I didnt test it though)

If you just wanted to see the model through to the end in 3d, then "Planar" would fill in the top (All points need to be level in Z)

EDITED: 24 Jul 2009 by BURRMAN

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 From:  Joe (JPITZ31)
2799.33 In reply to 2799.32 
Hi Burr,

My cnc system uses proprietary software and cuts complex curves as raster lines. (CarveWright) I will have to play around and see if I can get it to cut a profile by using a series of vector lines. As a result I will more than likely have to use planar to fill in as a solid. Any difference in depth would be picked up and possibly affect the height map.

You did mention that there was a step over formula to calculate width and height of cut based on tool diameter? What would be the correct name of this formula that I could google.

I have tried tool bit step over and step over formula.

Thanks

Joe
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 From:  BurrMan
2799.34 In reply to 2799.33 
Hi Joe,
So can Carvewright create a toolpath from this?



If so, then I was suggesting making curves from those sections that would look like this




Then when you cut each curve, it would cut at its own depth and create a "step".



This is the step I was talking about.




If the part is 1 inch high, and the spacing of each level is .8 and you use a .5 ballnose cutter, then the ridges in between each level will be at some hight. The more levels, or curves, the finer the step and the smoother the surface (The longer the cut time). Less curves and levels is faster cut time, then you just pull the piece off the machine and do a quick sand or grind to smoth the toolpath edges away.

It's not a formula I mentioned, just a decision to be made on how you want to cut it.

Also, after doing some experimenting with this to show you, it becomes more apparent that it's harder to implement than I'm making it sound. It would require working the curves a bit to get a good profile. May be better off just going the hieghtmap software route.

EDITED: 19 Jun 2012 by BURRMAN

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 From:  Joe (JPITZ31)
2799.35 In reply to 2799.34 
Hi Burr,

Yes, that is how I imagined it. That is how CarveWright would cut a series of vector tool paths. But I see what you mean. I tried to lay out a series of character outlines in order to try to sweep them. But it was very hard to space them apart. I will try you suggestion on using the array of profiles. CarveWright would then cut this as a raster pattern. But the nice thing it that Raster patterns can be re-sized very easily.

If that does not work than I will try to create some height maps in Paint Shop Pro or one of the packages mentioned here on the forum.

I will post my designs when I work them all out. If I am lucky I will also include a a cut piece as well.

Thanks for all of the help.

Joe
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 From:  BurrMan
2799.36 In reply to 2799.35 
Good luck Joe!
I feel I was starting to make it more complicated than it should be. I have one other suggestion I'll post in a bit.
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 From:  BurrMan
2799.37 In reply to 2799.36 
Nevermind. Too Nutty!
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 From:  Colin
2799.38 In reply to 2799.35 
Hi Joe,

My work is jewellery sized, so this following idea is solely based on that...forgive me if it doesn't apply to your situation.

Given that I required a certain type of angle or taper to the design, I'll often just use a specific Cutter which has that specific angle.
I source most of these Conical/Taper shaped Cutters from Bits & Bits http://www.bitsbits.net/
For milling waxes to suit jewellery work I'm mostly using the Profile or Pyramid type Cutters with a 6, 10 or 15 degree angle.

The range of Engraving Cutters have more angle options & might be more suited to your needs?
Not sure what Shank size you'd use with the CarveWright system, but maybe this might give you an idea for viable Cutters available to you?

regards Colin
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 From:  Joe (JPITZ31)
2799.39 In reply to 2799.38 
Thanks for the tip Colin, I can use 1/2", 1/4" or 1/8" shanks. That might be worth a try. I could extrude the surface and then mill around the outside with a profile shaped bit. The only concern I may have is if the bit has to go in between a narrow section or the inside or a radius curve.

Thanks

Joe
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 From:  Frenchy Pilou (PILOU)
2799.40 
Seems we have forget a very speedy method!
The rail revolve!
Just find an a good vertical axis

---
Pilou
Is beautiful that please without concept!
My Gallery
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