Mesh looks crimped, surface separating from edge?

Next
 From:  nycL45
2725.1 
The attached images should explain the question. The file also includes the extrusion solid, profile spline and the rail spline.

The source of the profile spline is from a door manufacturer and looks whole. I played with the mesh angle and the Add detail to inflections without any improvement. The mesh is not right which is to say I missed something.

Leonard

Image Attachments:
Size: 91.9 KB, Downloaded: 55 times, Dimensions: 542x577px
Size: 143.9 KB, Downloaded: 38 times, Dimensions: 655x863px
Size: 132.9 KB, Downloaded: 32 times, Dimensions: 625x339px
  Reply Reply More Options
Post Options
Reply as PM Reply as PM
Print Print
Mark as unread Mark as unread
Relationship Relationship
IP Logged

Previous
Next
 From:  Frenchy Pilou (PILOU)
2725.2 In reply to 2725.1 
Yes you must enable "add detail to inflexions" and put an angle like 5 (make some try)
Hope this help

Careful for big models this can slow down computer
So with big models works without details and at the end enable it for smart images!
  Reply Reply More Options
Post Options
Reply as PM Reply as PM
Print Print
Mark as unread Mark as unread
Relationship Relationship
IP Logged

Previous
Next
 From:  nycL45
2725.3 In reply to 2725.2 
Thanks for the help, PILOU. I knew it was me. -L.
  Reply Reply More Options
Post Options
Reply as PM Reply as PM
Print Print
Mark as unread Mark as unread
Relationship Relationship
IP Logged

Previous
Next
 From:  Michael Gibson
2725.4 In reply to 2725.1 
Hi Leonard, that's basically a display artifact that you kind of learn to ignore.

In order to display the model on the screen, it has to be diced up into triangles to be sent over to your video card.

That's because your video card display hardware really only knows how to draw triangles, it does not itself know how to draw full smooth surface patches like your model actually contains.

So what you see shaded on the screen is only an approximation of your actual model data.

If it does not get approximated with enough density, it will result in the display you see there.

But that is not necessarily a bad thing, it can help in some situations to have a kind of rougher display since that makes for fewer triangles to be sent to the video card. If you get a whole lot of triangles it can tend to slow things down.

And in fact, it looks like you have reduced your settings from the default at some point in order to make for a coarser (and therefore faster) display at some point - by default the angle is 10 degrees and "add detail to inflections" is on. But even with the default settings which are somewhat on the dense side, you can still sometimes see evidence of the triangulation process.

Just be aware that seeing that does not automatically indicate that there is an "error" or in your model, what you are seeing on the screen there is only an approximation of your actual model definition.

So basically you just learn to ignore what you are seeing there.

In the future I'll probably be making some adjustments to try and do a bit more strategic refinement of the display mesh, but it is a sensitive area for performance, since just slamming out a whole ton more triangles can easily lead to bogging things down.

- Michael
  Reply Reply More Options
Post Options
Reply as PM Reply as PM
Print Print
Mark as unread Mark as unread
Relationship Relationship
IP Logged

Previous
Next
 From:  Michael Gibson
2725.5 In reply to 2725.1 
Hi Leonard, also one other thing you can do is if you are interested in how things will look when polygonzied, you can export to a polygon mesh format such as OBJ.

The export mesher has a dialog with a lot more controls for producing the export mesh, and the export mesher itself has a much more thorough (and also correspondingly slower) process for producing the mesh, so it is able to refine areas with polygons that may be missed by the display mesher since the display mesher generally takes some shortcuts in order to focus on getting results quickly.

- Michael
  Reply Reply More Options
Post Options
Reply as PM Reply as PM
Print Print
Mark as unread Mark as unread
Relationship Relationship
IP Logged

Previous
Next
 From:  nycL45
2725.6 
Great explanations Michael. I will experiment when I export (.obj) to see what I am getting. Thanks. -L.
  Reply Reply More Options
Post Options
Reply as PM Reply as PM
Print Print
Mark as unread Mark as unread
Relationship Relationship
IP Logged

Previous
Next
 From:  Michael Gibson
2725.7 In reply to 2725.6 
Hi Leonard, no problem, I'm glad that helped!

One other note - if you are going to be frequently saving to an OBJ file just for testing what the mesh is going to look like, it can be handy to set up a keyboard shortcut for doing a kind of "dummy save" so you can see the export meshing results.

To do that, go to Options / Shortcut keys, and add in a new entry. For the command put in this:

SaveAs c:\test.obj

Then whenever you hit that key it will go through the process of saving to a file c:\test.obj, and will pop up the export meshing options dialog right away, without needing to deal with the file name dialog. Then cancel out of the mesh dialog after you see what the mesh looks like.

- Michael
  Reply Reply More Options
Post Options
Reply as PM Reply as PM
Print Print
Mark as unread Mark as unread
Relationship Relationship
IP Logged

Previous
 From:  nycL45
2725.8 In reply to 2725.7 
Sweet! Thanks for the extra tip, Michael and I will set up that shortcut. -L.
  Reply Reply More Options
Post Options
Reply as PM Reply as PM
Print Print
Mark as unread Mark as unread
Relationship Relationship
IP Logged
 

Reply to All Reply to All