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 From:  BurrMan
1870.11 In reply to 1870.10 
Sure Danny your right on. If I can convey my intrest I'm sure you could answer.

When I say training, I'm not going to college to become a Mechanical Engineer. I mean going to "Solidworks" Classes or "Rhino" Classes. I think the softwares offer training. I would have to start at "Know's Nothing" and progress through to a point where my intrest, ability and needs are met.

Lets seperate 2 area's here.

1.Design, inspiration and ability (Individual)
2.Tools available, Environment exposure, resources to draw from (circumstances)

I'm refering more to 2.

When I talk of you being proficient in NX I mean we dont have to explain "2 rail sweep" to you. more so there are functions in Rhino or Solidworks I would not understand as MoI is not in this area. You would know this as it must be standard stuff.

>>Yes, but both guys would have to be trained in these fields and gain experience, you have to realize that the software doesn't teach you how to design, the designer uses the software to convey their ideas.
>>.

Theres the point. An artistic guy would have to know what the toolset is capable of and be aware of whats available to move forward. Learning the software opens the possibilities and also "I beleive" sets limitations.(These limitations are overcome by the experience you mention, but I would be limited in my approach until I gain this experience. ie; different software does different things). With this I could utilize different tools in the future as i realize what I need to perform.

Hence, Taking a Rhino Class to learn their software will open many avenues for me. ("I never thought of it like that!).

So I guess does the 2 equate (Solidworks and Rhino) is a question to expound on. Does one give a more "Well rounded" experience or are they so mutually exclusive that you need both classes? Does well versed in one move easier into the other? (a Solidworks guy may use rhino for that thing rhino does so well, but he doesnt have to be an expert to utilize rhino... already knows functions of design, but may not work vise-versa, ie; would rhino guy be able to or need to utilize solidworks?.)

This could go on forever I suppose.

I'll be designing actual parts and things like assemblies, but i wont be designing buildings. Interoperabilty is a key factor.

Burr
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 From:  DannyT (DANTAS)
1870.12 In reply to 1870.11 
Hi Burr,

> I'll be designing actual parts and things like assemblies,
> but i wont be designing buildings. Interoperabilty is a key factor.

Well there's a key word that points to Solidworks, "assemblies".

This is where Solidworks has it's strengths over Rhino, for example in Solidworks when you do an assembly you have the parts 'mated' and these mated faces are remembered by the software so if you move a face in one part say by making it slightly thicker, the mated part would automatically adjust to it, or if you have a shaft diameter linked to a hole diameter in another part, when you change the hole diameter the shaft will adjust accordingly, this is what parametrically linked is.
But Solidworks is mainly a solid modeler the surface toolset is not as rich as Rhino's, like it would be more difficult to achieve more organic shapes in Solidworks than it would in Rhino or MoI.

So you have to weigh up the strengths and weaknesses of each software with what you want to use it for.

Hope this helps.
~Danny~
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 From:  BurrMan
1870.13 In reply to 1870.12 
Thanks Danny,
Seems they are just 2 different animals. May start with Rhino and later move to the parametric stuff. It's feature rich and I should learn most design concepts from there, and then expand out later.

MoI is allowing me to build some fundamentals to take to the next level as a base.

Burr

BTW: Can Parametric be NURBS? What is solidworks?
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 From:  Michael Gibson
1870.14 In reply to 1870.13 
Hi Burr,

> BTW: Can Parametric be NURBS?

Yes - the standard type of parametric software generates NURBS objects. The objects themselves are NURBS using the same type of geometry that MoI use.

The stuff that makes it "parametric" is the workflow, the UI, and all the other history mechanisms and editing tools which are all extra things than just the NURBS surface geometry.


> What is solidworks?

It's a parametric history-based solid modeler.

- Michael
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 From:  Anis
1870.15 In reply to 1870.14 
Hi Burr & All....

Basically I come from solidworks. I have been use solidworks for 3 years. Its a powerful solid & surface modeling also. The big different is solidworks have a parametric concept like Michael mentioned before. As I know solidworks is the easiest parametric modeling software.

But today my favourite software is MoI ( because the easy to use workflow & of course MoI is very affordable ).
You can open MoI file directly use solidworks. So it will give you a good combination.

You can find some solidworks video here : http://www.solidworks.com/pages/products/swofficepro/SWOfficePremium_VidVau_fore.html
Also check this link : http://download.rhino3d.com/download.asp?id=rhino-solidworks

OK, that is my opinion ;)

EDITED: 15 Aug 2008 by ANIS

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 From:  BurrMan
1870.16 In reply to 1870.15 
Thanks guy's. I think I would utilize both. The training I will start with Rhino for a bas then move to solidworks to add to the toolset.

Thanks again.
Burr
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